Policy

  • MLML Aquaculture Facility
    • Sustainable aquaculture for California
    • The Governing Board provides general guidance and decision-making capability for the Aquaculture Program and consists of faculty and researchers associated with MLML and various partners in the California State Universities. 
  • Race for Rights to the Ocean's Genetic Resources 
    • "Countries are currently negotiating a landmark global deal known as the BBNJ (biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction)"
    • Scheduled for 2020, the BBNJ is a move towards international oceanic regulation.
    •  "The high seas treaty must not only protect marine biodiversity, but accommodate existing legal treaties, and bridge a deep north-south divide in the development statuses, technological capacities and conservation beliefs of the countries involved."
    • Topics covered in the article:
      • ‘Freedom of high seas’ versus ‘common heritage’
      • Governance gaps
      • China: between north and south
  • SAMS UN Policy Brief: Safeguarding the future of the global seaweed aquaculture industry
    • Makes a number of recommendations including a precautionary approach. Improving biosecurity, disease prevention and detection measures are critical, together with establishing policies and institutions. This will provide incentives and steer the long term economic and environmental development of the seaweed aquaculture industry. This brief highlights issues that need to be addressed to create long term sustainability in this sector.
    • It is during early-stage development that the most frequent ecological consequences arise (invader/non-native species and epiphytes, accidental pest introductions harming native seaweeds, too dense monocultures, and disease outbreaks).
    • A significant expansion of the global seaweed cultivation industry has been driven by the growing demand for contaminant-free seaweed and by the commercial sector requiring seaweed-derived products for biotechnological, and medical applications in countries with little traditional interest in seaweed aquaculture or consumption.
    • Cultivation of seaweed is increasingly being used to reduce the environmental impact of intensive finfish aquaculture through integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) techniques.
    • In the last decade, the rapid expansion of the industry has been driven by the growing global demand for edible seaweeds that are contaminant-free, with a high level of traceability and for products for pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and antimicrobial and biotechnological applications. The accessibility of non-indigenous seed plants, typically supplied by the buyers, the rapid spread of technological and scientific knowledge, the requirement for only basic technology and minimal capital investment and the promotion by government agencies supporting economic development, particularly in rural communities have also contributed.
    • With world marine capture fisheries stagnating and animal aquaculture expanding at an average annual rate of 9.5 % in 1990 - 2000, aquaculture is becoming the main source of marine dietary protein
  • Now Underway, the Great Seabed Enclosure
    • Russia sent a submersible craft 4 kilometers beneath the North Pole to plant a titanium flag on the floor of the ocean. Its purpose: to stake a claim on the continental shelf where there may exist oil, gas and methane hydrates, a mineral deposit that can be a source of energy
    • The latest land grab is inspired by the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea adopted in 1982. Under the Convention, nations that ratified the treaty by May 13, 1999, had ten years in which to assert claims over specific tracts of the ocean floor that lay beyond the customary 200 nautical miles from shore.
  • Trump Admin. Pitches Seaweed For Biofuel-Powered Car Of The Future
    • U.S. Department of Energy awarded $22 million in grants aimed at pushing conventional fuel aside by accelerating the development of next-generation biofuel. The funds came through the agency’s ARPA-E funding program for cutting edge technology
    • According to the Department of Energy, US offshore resources could support enough seaweed production to supply up to 10% of the current demand for transportation fuel.
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