Research

  • The Seaweed Site
  • Microalgae Biofuels Myths and Risks
    • report from biofuelwatch.org 
  • Mussel and Seaweed Cultivation in Offshore Wind Farms: Germany
  • Macroalgal Herbarium Portal
    • The goal of the NSF funded Macroalgal Digitization Project is to image, database and georeference the macroalgal specimens in 49 herbaria from New England to Florida, to Hawaii and Guam.
    • Data provided through this project portal will allow researchers to determine how macroalgal biodiversity and our aquatic ecosystems have changed over the past 150 years as a result of climate change, bioinvasions, and a wide range of human activity.
  • New Approaches to Scalable Ocean Cultivation, Harvest, and Processing of Macroalgae for Energy, Chemicals, Feed, and Food: Workshop Summary Report, including information on:
    • History of US Department of Energy macroalgae projects – major conclusions
    • Development of open source seaweed culture system technologies in the Northeast US
    • Macrocystis production and conversion in Chile – lessons learned
    • Techno-economic cost considerations & Breakout #1 instructions
    • Critical challenges for moving macroalgae cultivation to fuel- relevant scale
    • System design/Infrastructure & capital
    • Macro algae cultivation in Korea/Asia with emphasis on emerging technology trends
    • And much more… general topics include: technology, biofuel potential, international examples
  • UAF awarded $500,000 grant for seaweed study
    • The University of Alaska Fairbanks has been awarded a federal grant of $500,000 to study seaweed farming in Alaska. The project aims to integrate the seaweed farming process, including seed production, planting, growing, harvesting and re-seeding, using methods from the commercial fishing industry.
    • The aim of the grant: “What the Department of Energy wanted was a proposal to come up with news ways to mass-culture seaweeds offshore for a potential biofuel product,” -Mike Stekoll
  • Researchers testing methods of underwater farming
    • Woods Hole Research Institution researchers Scott Lindell and Erin Fischell are recipients of a $5.7 million grant from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency to build a marine farm with offshore fields of kelp growing on a latticework of line 8 ft below the waves. Each section is tethered by a single line to an anchor. The crop is watched over by a fleet of autonomous underwater robotic vehicles that use sensors to monitor grown and detect problems with the line or crop and then send data and photos to shore.
    • The WHOI project has two components, with Lindell, seafood biologists and geneticists developing a breeding program to develop strains of kelp that are tolerant of environmental conditions, like a wide range of ocean temperatures. They claim that this does not use GMO techniques but selective breeding.
  • Global Seaweed Summer School
  • Phycomorph European Guidelines for a Sustainable Aquaculture of Seaweeds
    • "Markets show increasing interest in seaweed resources and their potential role in European Blue Growth and Bioeconomy. The development of seaweed aquaculture thus involves, in the medium and long term, the expansion of cultivation at sea due to the unlimited space offered by the latter. However, offshore cultivation may bring meaningful impacts on the environment and on biodiversity owing to the risk of escape of propagules with the potential to affect local genetic biodiversity. The need to establish a framework for the sustainable and profitable development of European aquaculture is the impetus for these recommendations based on scientific expertise and identification of the challenges and bottlenecks currently preventing this sector’s development." (page 155)
  • Complex ocean behavior studied with 'artificial upwelling': University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology
    • A team of scientists is studying the complex ocean upwelling process by mimicking nature — pumping cold, nutrient-rich water from deep within the Pacific Ocean and releasing it into surface waters near Hawaii that lack the nitrogen and phosphorus necessary to support high biological production.
    • The scientists stress that the goal of creating artificially induced upwelling is to understand how marine microbial ecosystems respond to large-scale perturbations, "a critical step if we want to understand the risks of manipulating these large ecosystems in order to solve global greenhouse buildup," said Letelier, a professor in OSU's College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences.
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